Glutamate neurotransmission is an active area of research in major depressive disorder (MDD).1 Much of this interest revolves around glutamate’s role in regulating synaptic connectivity, one of several pathways that may strengthen and initiate the formation of new synaptic connections.1

As research advances, a deeper understanding of MDD is within reach.

Watch our video featuring Dr Samuel Wilkinson, Assistant Director at the Yale Depression Research Program, discussing the hypothesized roles of synaptic connections and glutamate signaling in MDD.

Discovered as a neurotransmitter after serotonin and other monoamines, glutamate neurotransmission is an active area of research in MDD.1

Much of this interest revolves around glutamate’s role in regulating synaptic connectivity, one of several pathways that may strengthen and initiate the formation of new synaptic connections.1

HOW GLUTAMATE SIGNALING WORKS

  • As part of a complex balancing act, glutamate signaling is tightly controlled by either inhibitory or excitatory proteins2
  • Once a burst of glutamate is released, the signal activates post-synaptic receptors3
  • These receptors then trigger downstream pathways that influence dendritic spine density, synaptic formation, and synaptic connectivity4
  • Glutamate signaling is one of several pathways that are being studied in MDD5

BDNF: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor

Ca2+: Calcium ions

TrkB: Tropomyosin-related kinase B

Dendritic spines: Principal sites of synapses in the brain

Inhibitory neurons: Neurons that mediate inhibitory neurotransmission

Excitatory neurons: Neurons that mediate excitatory neurotransmission

 

Watch THIS video or visit Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. to learn more.